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And finally……

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Thank you for visiting and purchasing plants at Wake-Robin. We have enjoyed seeing old friends and making new ones.

Until the next time,

Kind regards,

Mike & Barb Murphy

A final open day (and then au revoir)

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On Saturday from 10 am until 3, we will present a final selection of our eccentric plants for 2013. All plants (and we keep finding more) are priced at 50% off to enable us to make room for propagating new plants.

Above: Thymus longicaulis

Loquacious Labiates

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Not all members of the mint family are rapacious spreaders. These three are much more polite. From the top: Lamium orvala, Meehania urticifolia, and Lathyrus vernus ‘Alboroseus’.

Jewel of the forest

ImageShortia soldanelloides var. magna

Morning, after the rain

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We still have lots of plants for our second open weekend. I am potting up seedlings of a number of things, including Virginia bluebells and three species peonies. Although small, they are inexpensive. And, go figure, we still have Trillium sessile left as well as a few lady-slippers.

It promises to be a soggy day on Saturday, so a gardening day it will not be. Stop on by.

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From the top:

Sanguisorba hakusanensis, Disporum maculatum, Hydrophyllum virginianum, Trillium pusillum, Cardamine waldsteinii, and Pulsatilla vulgaris

Coming soon to a garden near you

Anemone Bill Baker

Anemone nemorosa ‘Bill Baker’

marshallia grandiflora

Marshallia grandiflora

Cyp. Gisela

Cypripedium ‘Gisela’

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Stachys macrantha robusta

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Paeonia mlokosewitschii hybrid

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Paeonia macrophylla

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Epimedium sempervirens ‘Violet Queen’

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Lychnis miqueliana and Nepeta ‘Joanna Reed’

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Closeup of Chaerophyllum hirsutum roseum

Bloodroot diversity

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A typical form of Sanguinaria canadensis found in Maine

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A semi double cultivar, ‘Jerry Flintoff’

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A rare cultivar with much larger and fuller flowers, ‘Edith Dusek’

We have the common form at the nursery. We will also have a few of each of the named cultivars. They will be on our ” Just-A-Few” table.

Scenes from Wake-Robin, part 1

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Anemonella thalictroides ‘Shoaff’s Pink’ is a fully double form of our native species.

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Interesting contrast between the foliage of ┬áthe native Dutchman’s Breeches (Dicentra cucullaria) (right) and the light pink form of the species.

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Trillium pusillum ‘Roadrunner’ blooms at a mere 5″ tall.

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Fern Leaf Peony seedlings a year after sowing.

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Scopolia carniolica in bloom.

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Primula ‘Perle von Bottrop’

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Filipendula ulmeria ‘Aurea’ emerging in the garden.

Anemones Rising

Signals of spring, some subtle, some overt. Wood frogs, a phoebe claiming ground, the “Oh, look there!” reddening of a red maple bottomland. Overt for sure. But, what about Jupiter slipping off the horizon after sunset; or, the first push of woodland anemones through crusty earth; or, a Solitary Vireo, at the edge of hearing, on the ridgetop?

Spring is a season for noticing things, but in the north it is also a season for busying ourselves with pent up chores. On a scribbled list on the kitchen table: Rake (the detritus of winter.) Check.

We have been busy potting plants and writing labels, sowing seeds and… noticing the myriad of colors, forms, strategies that plants have for reaching sunlight, reaching water, attracting pollinators, and warding off consumers; and, of course, noticing each other as we find such aesthetic pleasure in it all.

Join us during our open days to notice the strange, beautiful and clever plant world.

Plant Sales for Spring 2013

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It snowed last night and it’s cold! So, what’s going on? Well, in the greenhouses, plants are popping despite freezing at night- we don’t heat them (they’re hardy plants after all!)

We started Wake-Robin Nursery a dozen or so years ago for two reasons: 1. because of an obsessive hobby (it was cheaper than therapy!); and, 2. it allowed me -Mike- to be a stay-at-home dad. We are now what you might call a part-time nursery: we open when we have propagated a critical number of plants. We sell out over several weeks and then start anew with cuttings and seeds and divisions. And I should mention: these weeks are busy ones and plants sell out fast. So come early.

We will be bringing plants to Maine Garden Day on April 6th. Open the tab above to see the list of what we intend to bring. Hope to see you there. We will also let you know about the other shows and sales we will attend.

In a week or so: Look for an expanded plant list; our on-site open times; and, directions to our West Paris, (just-short-of-paradise) Maine locale.